Subject Verb Agreement Betty Azar

Word-subject contract with quantity expression (Figure 14-6) student book. 5th edition. Before the fifth edition xi Recognitions xiii Chapter 1 PRESENTE AND PAST; SIMPLE AND PROGRESSIVE 1 1-1 Simple Present and Present Progressive 2 1-2 Simple Present and Progressives: Affirmatives, Negatives, Question Forms 5 1-3 verbs, intentions normally not satisfied in progressive verbs 7 1-4 Simple Past Tense 12 1-5 Simple Past vs. Past Progressives 16 1-6 Unsealed: War/Waren to 21 Chapter 2 PERFECT AND PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSES 25 2-1 Regular and Irregular Words 26 2-2 Irregular Word 26-2 2 3 Present Perfect: Since and For 29 2-4 Present Perfect: Unspecified Time and Repeated Events 31 2-5 Have and Hat in spoken English 35 2-6 Present Perfect vs. Simple Past 36 2-7 Present Perfect Progressive 40 2-8 Past Perfect 44 2-9 Hadken 46 22 -10 Past Perfect Progressive 47 Chapter 3 FUTURE TIME 53 3-1 Simple Future: Will Forms and Go to 54 3-2 milvs. Be at 56 3-3 expression of the future in time clauses 60 3-4 With the current progressive present and the present simple, to express the future time 62 3-5 Future Progressive 63 3-6 Future Perfect and Future Perfect Progressive 65 Chapter 4 REVIEW OF VERB TENSES 70 Chapter 5 SUBJECT -VERB AGREEMENT 78 5-1 Final -sl-es: Use and Spelling 7 9 5-2 Basic Subject-Verb Agreement 80 5-3 Collective Nomen 82 5-4 Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Expressions of Quantity 84 5-5 Subject-Verb Agreement: Using There – Be 86 5-6 Subject Verbe Agreement: Some Irregularities 88 Chapter 6 NOUNS 94 6-1 Regular and Irregular Plural Nouns 95 6-2 Nomen as Adjektivs 98 6-3 Possessive Nomen 101 6-4 More About Expressing Possession 103 6 -5 Count and Noncount Nouns 105 6-6 Noncount Nouns 107 6-7 Some Common Noncount Nouns 107 6-8 Expressions of Quantity Used with Count and Noncount Nouns 110 6-9 Using A Few And Few; A Little and Little 113 6-10 Singular Expressions of Quantity: One, Each, Every 115 6-11 Using Of in Expressions of Quantity 117 Chapter 7 ARTICLES 122 7-1 Articles (A, An, 123 7-2 Articles: Generic Nouns 125 7-3 Descriptive information with individual and indeterminate names 128 7-4 General Guidelines for Use Of 130 7-5 Use of titles and geographical names 134 Chapter 8 PRONOUNS 139 8-1 Pronouns and Possessivadjektive 1 40 8-2 Agreement with generic names and indeterminate pronouns 145 8-3 Personal pronouns: agreement with collective nomads 146 8-4 Reflexive pronouns 1 1 8-5 Using You, One, and They as Impersonal Pronomen 151 8-6 Forms of Other 153 8-7 Common Expressions with Other 157 Chapter 9 MODALS , PART 1 161 9-1 Basic Modal Introduction 162 9-2 Expression Need Sun: Must, have to 163 9-3 lack of necessity (not have to) and ban (should not) 165 9-4 Advisability/ Suggestions: If, Ought To, Had Better, could be 167 9-5 waiting: should be accepted/must be 171 9-6 capacity: can know how, and be able 173 9-7 Opportunity: May, Might 175 9-8 Questions and Answers with Modals 176 9-9 Polite Requests with WouldYou Mind 177 9-10 Suggestions: 2 184 10-1 With Dementia Repeated Action in past 185 10-2 Expressions of the past: necessity, desirability, waiting 187 10-3 Expression of past competence 191 10-4 degrees of security: Current time 192 10-5 degrees of security: Negative present 194 10-6 degrees of safety : Past Time 196 10-7 Degrees of Safety: Future Time 199 10-8 Progressive Modal Forms 201 10 -9 Modal Combination with Phrasal Mod 205 10-10 Expressing Preference: Would Rather 207 10-11 Summary Chart of Modals and Similar Expressions 208 Chapter 11 THE PASSIVE 215 11-1 Active vs.

Posted in Uncategorized