Collaborative Practice Agreement

According to health researcher Karen E. Koch, the first initiative of “collaborative management of drug therapy” can be attributed to William A. Zellmers in 1995 in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. [4] Zellmer argues for the use of the term “collaborative management of drug therapy” instead of “prescription,” and argues that this will make laws that expand the authority of pharmacists tastier for legislators (and physician representatives). The most important is the debate on why pharmacists are interested in extending this authority: improving patient care through interdisciplinary cooperation. [5] The modern concept of collaborative practice has been partly derived from the controversial notion of dependent prescribing authority. [4] According to the PPAC, the certified pharmacist-clinician is authorized to register for a personal DeK number (Drug Enforcement Administration). His field of activity is mainly general medicine and therapeutics. Currently, they have a normative authority for these three types of disease status: high cholesterol, diabetes and hypertension in specific disease management protocols. [47] A Collaborative Practice Agreement (CPA) is a legal document in the United States that establishes a legal relationship between clinical pharmacists and cooperating physicians, allowing pharmacists to participate in collaborative therapy management (CDTM). In 2010, the American Medical Association (AMA) published a series of reports entitled “AMA Scope of Practice Data Series.” [61] One report focused on the pharmacy profession, which criticized the formation of CPAs as an attempt by pharmacists to intervene with the physician.

In response to the report, a collaboration of seven national pharmacists` associations prepared a response to the WADA Pharmacists Report. [62] The response called on WADA to correct its report and publish the revised report with Errata. [63] In 2011, the WADA Chamber of Deputies adopted a more flexible tone of the APhA in response to contributions from aPhA and other pharmacy professional associations and finally adopted the following resolution: which focused the Attention to the rejection of independent (rather than collaborative or dependent) practice agreements: CDTM is an extension of the traditional pharmacist practice that allows pharmacists to manage drug-related problems (DPDs) based on a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to pharmaceutical practice. The conditions of a CPA are defined by the pharmacist and the cooperating physician, although models exist online. CPAs may be specific to a patient population of interest to both parties, a specific clinical situation or disease, and/or a factual protocol for managing the drug treatment of patients under CPA. CPAs have been the subject of intensive debate in pharmacy and medicine. D`Arkansan CPs apply to individual pharmacists, practitioners who are “authorized to prescribe drugs” and who are indicated in patients. The specific disease stipulates that pharmacists administer, with indicated medications that the pharmacist can use are necessary.

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